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Seagan

There is sea of information (no pun intended!) out there about healthy eating and the impact of food production versus sustainability.

Many people are looking for ways to make changes to their diet that won’t cost the earth – and seaganism is reported to be the latest trend which could potentially fulfil those needs.

So, what is Seaganism? 

Seaganism is a diet combining fish with a plant-based diet. It differs from pescatarianism in that a seagan diet does not include eggs or dairy and there is an emphasis on only eating fish that is sustainably sourced.

The term ‘seaganism’ was first coined in 2016 by food writers Amy Cramer and Lisa McComsey, the duo behind The Vegan Cheat Sheetbook and the movement has grown in popularity over the last couple of years.

In February 2019 the UK’s leading authority on seafood, Seafish, announced a new campaign Think Seagan.

Healthy Lifestyle & Dietary Choice

The campaign showcases why the diet is a healthy lifestyle and dietary choice, providing enhanced nutritional value and Seafish has produced a variety of materials suggesting new and innovative ways to consume and enjoy fish as part of the campaign.

This includes a seagan ‘starter’ kit, 28-day seagan meal plan, seagan recipes including how-to videos, and a store cupboard guide to the vegan essentials. There is also a range of educational tools, such as seafood fact and myth sheets.

Think Seagan

Marcus Coleman, Chief Executive of Seafish, said: “The health benefits of eating seafood are well documented and coupled with the benefits of a plant-based diet, seagansim presents a sustainable, tasty and flexible diet for people of all ages and stages of life.

“Our Think Seagan campaign will inspire and educate those looking to make changes to their diet.”

Joanna Stewart, Registered Dietitian, added: “The Eatwell Guide produced by Food Standards Scotland shows us the different types of foods we should eat, and in what proportions, to have a healthy, balanced diet. 

“It recommends we should be eating two portions of fish a week, one of which should be oily. In Scotland this means that most of us should be trying to increase our intake of fish and shellfish in line with current guidance. 

“Shellfish in particular, are low in fat, especially low in saturated fat and are an excellent source of protein. Some types of shellfish such as mussels, oysters and crabs, are good sources of Omega- 3 fats, which help prevent heart disease. Shellfish also contain a variety of vitamins and minerals including selenium, zinc, iodine, copper and vitamin B12 which are all essential for good health.”

Get Started 

For more information on Think Seagan or to download materials visit: www.fishisthedish.co.uk/health/think-seagan

Shellfish and Guinness

Scottish Shellfish and Guinness? With the exception of oysters, perhaps it’s not the most obvious choice. But sometimes the most surprising combinations can be the most delicious…

Celtic connections

As St Patrick’s Day looms, it’s not just Celtic connections that we Scots and Irish share. We both have a long history of making the most of our natural produce, and exporting our proud traditions.

Guinness

One proud Irish tradition is the brewing of Guinness. Unless you’ve been living under a rock, there’s no doubt you’ve heard of Guinness. Originally brewed in Dublin in 1759, it’s the national tipple.  What you may not know is that (unlike other stouts or dark beers) Guinness is proven to have some health-giving qualities. The anti-oxidants it contains can help reduce blood clots and the risk of heart attacks.

A healthy and delicious combination

At a time when we’re bombarded with ever-more confusing dietary advice, it’s good to know that the health benefits of shellfish are also undisputed. Scottish shellfish and Guinness is a healthy and surprisingly delicious combination. So, why not push the boat out this St Patrick’s Day and try it for yourself? You don’t even need to go out to eat; there are lots of great shellfish recipes which you can wash down with a pint of the famous dark beer.

The ultimate fast food

Lots of people associate shellfish with high days and holidays. It’s certainly true that a brace of fresh oysters, a feast of tangy brown crabmeat or the taste of world-renowned lobster are an undeniable treat. But the seas and sea lochs of our west coast give us an embarrassment of riches when it comes to shellfish. Which means you don’t need to think of them only as a luxury, they’re more accessible than you think.

And as shellfish by their very nature require minimal cooking, they are the ultimate fast food. Why not consider making them an integral part of your diet? There are lots of simple, delicious recipes on our website. Whether you want to cook mussels, oysters, langoustines, crab or lobster – you’ll find something healthy, delicious and quick on our recipes page.

Unusual combinations

Don’t be afraid to try some more of our unusual and delicious combinations. Mussels for example lend themselves to a surprising variety of beverages such as white beer, prosecco, and even gin and tonic.  We’re continually adding to the recipes on our site, so check back every week for the latest combinations which are surprisingly easy to make.

Remember to drink responsibly. Happy St Patrick’s Day. Cheers!

Oysters are a well-known aphrodisiac

Casanova’s breakfast choice

Valentine’s Day is upon us!  Now is the time to plan a special meal that will tantalise your loved one. Oysters the well-known aphrodisiac, purportedly increasing the libido of all who eat them. In fact, Casanova is said to have started his day with 50 of these delicious bivalves! But did you know that plenty of other shellfish have the same sexy quality?

Shellfish the natural aphrodisiac!

A true aphrodisiac, increases sexual potency in men and desire in women.  With some cultures claiming that they also contribute to improved fertility. While all claims to unparalleled desire must be taken with a small pinch of salt, there is indeed truth to the idea that oysters and other shellfish are good for a boost.

Power of Zinc

Help comes in the form of zinc, in which oysters, mussels, and other molluscs are particularly high. Low levels of zinc can contribute to diminished libido, as can low levels of testosterone. Zinc triggers the release of testosterone in each sex, which will give both men and women that burst of energy they are looking for on February 14th!

Spoil your other half

Even without the chemical evidence, there’s something to be said for preparing a tasty meal and surprising your partner. Delicate flavours from the best sources in the world, can’t fail to earn you brownie points.  Cooking a treat of a meal for your lover is better than serving up all the outlandish aphrodisiacs in the world.

Valentine recipes

Half a dozen oysters, freshly shucked and served with a squeeze of lemon, or a dash of Tabasco if you like it hot; lobster with lashings of butter; a bottle of crisp white wine, all taken by candlelight and soft music playing in the background. Now that sounds like the ideal way to show your other half just how much they mean to you, and any nutritional benefits are just a happy plus-point.

Oysters are a well-known aphrodisiac

In recent years there have been many TV adverts and health promotions highlighting how important Omega 3 fatty acids are for our health. How they are particularly good for your brain, but what are the other benefits?

Fatty Acids

Omega 3 is also known as ‘fatty acids’, but don’t be fooled by the description, we need healthy fats in our diets to keep our brains working.  Omega-3’s also serve to cut cholesterol, which is fantastic news for your heart.  It is suggested that even one portion of shellfish per week can reduce the chances of a heart attack by 10%!

Benefits

The benefits of Omega-3 fatty acids extend to almost every area of health. Pregnant women may want to give their babies a boost by including them in their diet.  This will improve vision and even intelligence in the babies while they are still in the womb. Adults will gain benefits too, because including Omega-3 fatty acids in their diet has been shown to help with memory loss and even depression.

Shellfish & Omega 3

Shellfish are high in Omega 3’s which means a healthy heart, a healthy brain, and healthy bones.  All from just one to two delicious shellfish additions to your weekly meal routine.

What’s not to love about shellfish?  Find out if all shellfish are good for you here.

oysters for the poor

It’s hard to believe that oysters used to be considered a peasants’ food. Barrels of ice and freshly shucked oysters were to be found on London street corners, and pubs served them up with pints as a snack.

Cheap and sustainable

The reason for the popularity of these tasty bivalves was the low-price point, a result of the ease in which they grow naturally. As filter feeders, they help to keep the water around them clear and sweet.  Meaning that even the farmed variety are sustainable and ecologically sound.

The Oyster, An aphrodisiac?

As popularity increased, so did the price.  This meant that often they were a treat enjoyed on special occasions. The reputation of oysters as an aphrodisiac grew, and they began to be associated with Valentine’s Day.

While there are no special qualities that are specifically good for this sort of celebration, oysters contain plenty of zinc.  Zinc is an energy booster that creates a feel-good mood, thus the connection between oysters and amore!

Other health benefits

Oysters (along with most other shellfish) are also high in iron, selenium, calcium, and vitamins including A, C, and B12.  Which means that including a couple in your weekly diet is one of the easiest possible ways to make sure you get your recommended dosage of health boosting minerals and vitamins.

Oyster serving suggestions

Low in calories and fat but high in protein, oysters should not continue to be relegated to the starter menu.  A dozen just-shucked oysters sprinkled with tabasco, mignonette, or simple lemon is a sure-fire way to get the taste buds tingling and satisfy hearty appetites. For those that prefer their molluscs warm, serve them grilled with butter and cream for a fulfilling option.

The delicate flavour of the sea comes through no matter what your favourite method happens to be. What’s more, oysters can be paired with a deliciously crisp white wine or a sturdy stout. Easy to prepare, a friend to all accompaniments, and healthy beyond belief.

Oysters really are the wonder-food that has been right under our noses all this time!

health benefits of shellfish

Last month we told you all about the health benefits of mussels but what are the health benefits of all shellfish?

  • Extra energy
  • Glowing skin
  • Healthy heart

To name a few, it’s hard to beat shellfish.

Shellfish are full of nutrients, minerals, and those excellent omega-3s. They are quick, easy and (above all) a delicious way to improve your diet. It's recommended you have 2 portions of fish a week.

Scottish Shellfish – On your doorstep!

Luckily, in Scotland we have a wide array of choice, and you can be sure that whatever you choose the journey from sea to plate is as quick as can be. All you should do is look forward to including fresh, delicate shellfish in your new favourite recipes.

Mussels, oysters, crab and lobster are extremely low in fat and high in protein which is good news for anybody hoping to lose weight without forgoing flavour.  A portion of shellfish will leave you feeling full and satisfied, all without sacrificing the calories.

What can I eat with shellfish?

The options are endless, but the classics are always a winner:

  • Mussels in white wine
  • Lobster with a little lemon
  • Crab and avocado salad
  • Oysters with a touch of tabasco

What could be more mouth-watering, while still being so very good for you?

Additional Benefits  

If the above isn’t reason enough to tuck into some tasty Scottish shellfish, they also contain zinc, copper, magnesium and iron, all necessary minerals that will improve health overall.  Iron deficiencies can leave you feeling tired and weak, so making sure to take in enough is a great way to boost energy levels, naturally.

Shellfish for dinner?

With such versatile, tempting produce available on our doorstep, fresh and sweet and ready for your recipes, it is almost a crime to ignore Scottish shellfish! With all the above benefits it’s surely time to add more mussels, oysters, crab and lobster to your diet?

Mussels

Mussels are an under-appreciated wonder food. Full of vitamins and minerals, high in protein and low in fat.  It is a wonder these culinary stars are not more of a staple in the British diet. However, with more information about the health benefits of mussels than ever before, it’s starting to change. Top nutritionists and fitness professionals have started to explore how the simple mussel boosts physical health.

Health Benefit 1 - High Protein and Low Fat

Seafood (shellfish in particular) is high in protein and low in fat. This is great news for anyone on a calorie restricted diet, as it shows it’s possible to enjoy exciting meals that are healthy without sacrificing flavour. There is no need for fat, as steaming or boiling with a few herbs or white wine is the best way to prepare a tasty mussel dish.

Health Benefit 2 - Iron & Protein

For those who enjoy a high-protein intake, mussels offer a welcome break from steak. Not only are they better for the environment (as they are ecologically friendly and easy to farm) they also offer levels of protein and iron that rival that of red meat.  An increase in protein and iron intake boosts mood, energy levels, and even complexion.  A fantastic outcome from introducing mussels to your weekly diet!

Health Benefit 3 - High in Vitamins A & B12

Vitamin A is excellent for the skin, eyes and immune system. While B12 is an essential vitamin that only naturally occurs in animal products. B12 deficiency can lead to problems with heart health and anaemia, among other complications, and is important for overall health. Make sure you get the recommended daily allowance from dairy products, eggs, and, of course, sources such as shellfish and mussels.

Health Benefit 4 - Improves Brain Function

Mussels contribute to circulatory health and energy levels.  Are brilliant for improving brain function and reducing inflammatory conditions, such as arthritis.

Health Benefit 5 - Omega-3 Fatty Acids

The heart benefits from a reduction in the risk of heart attack due to those all-important Omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3s are vital, and have all sorts of health benefits that should not be overlooked.

Why Mussels?

Mussels are one of the most well-rounded foods to include in your diet, high in zinc, iron and other minerals, vitamins A and B12. A fantastic source of protein, low in calories and low in fat. Prepared in a classic moules marinière or in a more adventurous Thai curry, or simply steamed. No matter how they are eaten, rest assured they are a delicious and healthy choice.

Healthy Benefits Mussels